Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health

von Welch, H. Gilbert
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Welch, H. Gilbert Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health
Welch, H. Gilbert - Overdiagnosed: Making People Sick in the Pursuit of Health

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Beschreibung

From a nationally recognized expert, an exposé of the worst excesses of our zeal for medical testing
Going against the conventional wisdom reinforced by the medical establishment and Big Pharma that more screening is the best preventative medicine, Dr. Gilbert Welch builds a compelling counterargument that what we need are fewer, not more, diagnoses. Documenting the excesses of American medical practice that labels far too many of us as sick, Welch examines the social, ethical, and economic ramifications of a health-care system that unnecessarily diagnoses and treats patients, most of whom will not benefit from treatment, might be harmed by it, and would arguably be better off without screening.
Drawing on twenty-five years of medical practice and research on the effects of medical testing, Welch explains in a straightforward, jargon-free style how the cutoffs for treating a person with "abnormal" test results have been drastically lowered just when technological advances have allowed us to see more and more "abnormalities," many of which will pose fewer health complications than the procedures that ostensibly cure them. Citing studies that show that 10 percent of two thousand healthy people were found to have had silent strokes, and that well over half of men over age sixty have traces of prostate cancer but no impairment, Welch reveals overdiagnosis to be rampant for numerous conditions and diseases, including diabetes, high cholesterol, osteoporosis, gallstones, abdominal aortic aneuryisms, blood clots, as well as skin, prostate, breast, and lung cancers.
With genetic and prenatal screening now common, patients are being diagnosed not with disease but with "pre-disease" or for being at "high risk" of developing disease. Revealing the economic and medical forces that contribute to overdiagnosis, Welch makes a reasoned call for change that would save us from countless unneeded surgeries, excessive worry, and exorbitant costs, all while maintaining a balanced view of both the potential benefits and harms of diagnosis. Drawing on data, clinical studies, and anecdotes from his own practice, Welch builds a solid, accessible case against the belief that more screening always improves health care.

Mitwirkende

Autor:
Welch, H. Gilbert
Woloshin, Steven
Schwartz, Lisa M.

Weitere Informationen

Biografie:
Dr. H. Gilbert Welch is a renowned authority on the effects of medical screening who has appeared on The Today Show, CNN, NPR, and in the New York Times and Washington Post. He and his coauthors, Dr. Lisa M. Schwartz and Dr. Steven Woloshin, nationally recognized experts in risk communication, are professors at the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. 

Rezension:
Very insightful and engaging. Dennis Rosen, The Boston Globe

One of the most important books about health care  in the last several years. Cato Institute 

"One of the big strengths of this relatively small book is that if you are inclined to ponder medicine's larger questions, you get to tour them all. What is health, really?... In the finite endeavor that is life, when is it permissible to stop preventing things? And if the big questions just make you itchy, you can concentrate on the numbers instead: The authors explain most of the important statistical concepts behind evidence-based medicine in about as friendly a way as you are likely to find." Abigail Zuger, MD, The New York Times

"Overdiagnosed albeit controversial is a provocative, intellectually stimulating work. As such, all who are involved in health care, including physicians, allied health professionals, and all current or future patients, will be well served by reading and giving serious thought to the material presented." JAMA

Everyone should read this book before going to the doctor! Welcome evidence that more testing and treatment is not always better. Susan Love, MD, author of Dr. Susan Love s Breast Book
 
This book makes a compelling case against excessive medical screening and diagnostic testing in asymptomatic people. Its important but underappreciated message is delivered in a highly readable style. I recommend it enthusiastically for everyone. Arnold S. Relman, MD, editor-in-chief emeritus, New England Journal of Medicine, and author of A Second Opinion: Rescuing America s Health Care
 
This stunning book will help you and your loved ones avoid the hazards of too much health care. Within just a few pages, you ll be recommending it to family and friends, and, hopefully, your local physician. If every medical student read Overdiagnosed, there is little doubt that a safer, healthier world would be the result. Ray Moynihan, conjoint lecturer at the University of Newcastle, visiting editor of the British Medical Journal, and author of Selling Sickness
 
An overdiagnosis is a label no one wants: it is worrisome, it augurs overtreatment, and it has no potential for personal benefit. This elegant book forewarns you. It also teaches you how and why to ask, Do I really need to know this? before agreeing to any diagnostic or screening test. A close read is good for your health. Nortin M. Hadler, MD, professor of medicine and microbiology/immunology at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and author of Worried Sick and The Last Well Person
 
We ve all been made to believe that it is always in people s best interest to try to detect health problems as early as possible. Dr. Welch explains, with gripping examples and ample evidence, how those who have been overdiagnosed cannot benefit from treatment; they can only be harmed. I hope this book will trigger a paradigm shift in the medical establishment s thinking. Sidney Wolfe, MD, author of Worst Pills, Best Pills and editor of WorstPills.org
Sprache:
Englisch
Inhaltsverzeichnis:
Table of Contents...

Introduction: Our Enthusiasm for Diagnosis

Chapter 1) Genesis: People Become Patients with High Blood Pressure
Chapter 2) We Change the Rules: How Numbers Get Changed to Give You Diabetes, High Cholesterol, and Osteoporosis
Chapter 3) We Are Able to See More: How Scans Give You Gallstones, Damaged Knee Cartilage, Bulging Discs, Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms, and Blood Clots
Chapter 4) We Look Harder for Prostate Cancer: How Screening Made It Clear That Overdiagnosis Exists in Cancer
Chapter 5) We Look Harder for Other Cancers
Chapter 6) We Look Harder for Breast Cancer
Chapter 7) We Stumble onto Incidentalomas That Might Be Cancer
Chapter 8) We Look Harder for Everything Else: How Screening Gives You (and Your Baby) Another Set of Problems
Chapter 9) We Confuse DNA with Disease: How Genetic Testing Will Give You Almost Anything
Chapter 10) Get the Facts
Chapter 11) Get the System
Chapter 12) Get the Big Picture

Conclusion: Pursuing Health with Less Diagnosis

Acknowledgments
Notes
Index
Exzerpt:
My first car was a 65 Ford Fairlane wagon. It was a fairly simple albeit
large vehicle. I could even do some of the work on it myself. There was a lot
of room under the hood and few electronics. The only engine sensors were a
temperature gauge and an oil-pressure gauge.
Things are very different with my 99 Volvo. There s no extra room under
the hood and there are lots of electronics. And then there are all those little
warning lights sensing so many different aspects of my car s function that
they have to be connected to an internal computer to determine what s wrong.
Cars have undoubtedly improved over my lifetime. They are safer, more
comfortable, and more reliable. The engineering is better. But I m not sure
these improvements have much to do with all those little warning lights.
Check-engine lights red flags that indicate something may be wrong
with the vehicle are getting pretty sophisticated. These sensors can identify
abnormalities long before the vehicle s performance is affected. They are
making early diagnoses.
Maybe your check-engine lights have been very useful. Maybe one of
them led you to do something important (like add oil) that prevented a much
bigger problem later on.
Or maybe you have had the opposite experience.
Check-engine lights can also create problems. Sometimes they are false
alarms (whenever I drive over a big bump, one goes off warning me that
something s wrong with my coolant system). Often the lights are in response
to a real abnormality, but not one that is especially important (my favorite is
the sensor that lights up when it recognizes that another sensor is not sensing).
Recently, my mechanic confided to me that many of the lights should
probably be ignored.
Maybe you have decided to ignore these sensors yourself. Or maybe
you ve taken your car in for service and the mechanic has simply reset them
and told you to wait and see if they come on again.
Or maybe you have had the unfortunate experience of paying for an
unnecessary repair, or a series of unnecessary repairs. And maybe you have
been one of the unfortunate few whose cars were worse off for the efforts.
If so, you already have some feel for the problem of overdiagnosis.
I don t know what the net effect of all these lights has been. Maybe they
have done more good than harm. Maybe they have done more harm than
good. But I do know there s little doubt about their effect on the automotive
repair business: they have led to a lot of extra visits to the shop.
And I know that if we doctors look at you hard enough, chances are we ll
find out that one of your check-engine lights is on.

A routine checkup

I probably have a few check-engine lights on myself. I m a male in my midfifties.
I have not seen a doctor for a routine checkup since I was a child. I m
not bragging, and I m not suggesting that this is a path others should follow.
But because I have been blessed with excellent health, it s kind of hard to
argue that I have missed out on some indispensable service.
Of course, as a doctor, I see doctors every day. Many of them are my
friends (or at least they were before they learned about this book). And I can
imagine some of the diagnoses I could accumulate if I were a patient in any
of their clinics (or in my own, for that matter):
From time to time my blood pressure runs a little high. This is particularly
true when I measure it at work (where blood pressure machines are
readily available).
Diagnosis: borderline hypertension
I m six foot four and weigh 205 pounds; my body mass index (BMI) is 25.
(A normal BMI ranges from 20 to 24.9.)
Diagnosis:
Seitenanzahl:
248
Zusammenfassung:
ISBN Overdiagnosed. Bucheinband-Typ: Taschenbuch, Geschrieben von: Lisa Schwartz, H. Gilbert Welch, Steve Woloshin, Anzahl der Seiten: 248 Seiten. Breite: 152,4 mm, Höhe: 228,6 mm
Medientyp:
Taschenbuch
Verlag:
Beacon Press

Stammdaten

Produkttyp:
Taschenbuch
Veröffentlichungsdatum:
3. Januar 2012
Verpackungsabmessungen:
0.224 x 0.152 x 0.022 m; 0.358 kg
GTIN:
09780807021996
DUIN:
GQRHJOKI2KJ
CHF 19.80
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